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about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act in laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 elections. >> why a writers institute? >> i think it is something that is very important. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are a key to our imagination, our capacity to imagine things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps soma, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that captures the human. . the >> joint american history television and c-span local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes of a letter lives of new york city. >> next you hear from bradley manning's attorney about his case. he is accused of leaking classified documents to the web site wikileaks. the trial is under way in maryland. he testified earlier on the conditions he has experienced since being detained in iraq. this is half an hour. >> i really appreciate the turn out here, especially the turn of by the press. thank you for that. i have not participated in any public event for today. i also avoid any interviews with th
there after the election. he says if there's something worse going on, he can't see it. >> i think there's a marked difference between this negotiation and what took place two summers, i guess, ago between speaker boehner and the president when frankly i thought the white house did a poor job of its advocacy for its own position. this is different. it's as if they learned i lesson. they're digging in deeply this time around. they have the wind at their back because of an election result. it's a strategy. as you mentioned he's campai campaigning today. it's like the campaign didn't end. >> chris, let me bring you in. a lot of people talk about this latest interview with secretary geithner. let me play a little bit of what he had to say regarding the fiscal cliff and the threat that looms. let me play it. >> when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy, those making more than $250,000, if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of
and new election would have to be called in 30 days of that happening. some analysts say his choice is not a shoo-in. >> what you need to consider here the opposition is strong position in venezuela. they did exactly well in the october elections. they are in a prime position to exploited the crisis in the regime. i don't think maduro is a shoo-in necessarily. >> he added if he were to be elected president of venezuela he would be as every bit as bad as u.s. ever since chavez took over venezuela his country as taken on a steady anti-american tone. he developed friendships with some of the world's worst dictators. no now, at least publicly chavez appears to be up for the continuing battling with cancer telling his people, quote, with god's will we will come out of this victorious. i have faith in that. that is a quote from chavez. >> gregg: arthel nevil, thanks. >> heather: as we mentioned we have just learned that president obama and house speaker john boehner met today at the white house to talk about ways to resolve the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, we have brand-new reaction from lawm
is simply a process. you had an election. he took a bow for their own enslavement and often do. people forget this. they think world for freedom. i'm sorry, but there's a constituency that is per submission. this is a site goes fact of life that is not fully appreciated. in the west. so how do you go about it? to distinguish between democracy and liberalism and you try as best you can to promote the spirit of liberalism, even if it is procedurally at the expense of the brotherhood. >> your response to that? >> i'm listening to this discussion which i enjoy thoroughly, but my mind as to how we do this. and i would throw home one point that i'm trying to stress here that i may agree or disagree with some of the things said. the problem in washington is you look at the democracy, freedom and liberal promotion mechanisms we have. they're actually not as nimble as they need to be. i look at benghazi and answers questions about the talking points, but the bigger policy deployed when he set up is how do we influence the next faith? ambassador chris stevens who is killed to honor his memory. r
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that spread to egypt and the egyptian revolution was concern to the united states. egypt has long held incredible importance to u.s. policy in the middle east. the u.s. reaction to that revolution was unclear. there were some that said this was a good thing that this would only lead to democracy. there were others who in
working inside the elected -- the elected claim ber of the united states stat or better off resigning and becoming head of the -- head of heritage? it was a no-brainer. you know -- >> remarkable. >> financial incentiveta. but it's remarkable and shows you limits in which being a united states senator -- i've talked to other senators who made the decision to try to get into leadership track who said it's no fun trying to be party of one or gang of six or gang of eight. it stinks especially ex-governors can't stand it in there. it is sad that you don't feel as if you can make a -- as big of a difference inside the senate as you can at a special interest group. welcome to politics of the 21st century. >> i couldn't agree more, chuck. frankly i think jim demint couldn't agree more. he said, i'm leaving the senate now but i'm not leaving the fight. i've decided to join the heritage foundation at a time when the conservative movement needs strong leadership in the battle of ideas. chuck, to your point. kelly, i want to go to you. in the midst, and we'll talk about the fiscal cliff in a minu
duly elected leadership are built on more stable foundation this can be substantial but brutal ties the u.s. maintains with the hosni mubarak regime in egypt or yemen. nowhere in the region is the struggle against dictatorship more vital than in syria. over the past 20 months it has become abundantly clear that with assad in power there is no possibility, none whatever, for democratic process in syria. for years syria has been one of the most repressive countries in the world according to the state department rights reports, analytical studies by freedom house. political dissidents were routinely in prisons or disappeared and journalists were silenced. human-rights activists operated underground living in constant fear of the dreaded -- mr reuel marc gerecht 23 -- assad was cast by many as a, quote, reformer but his terrible treatment of his own people should have been a strong indication of what he was really all about. callie government treats its people the true testament to its character. callie government treats its own people in vindication of how it will act on the world stag
leaders weren't leading and they aren't listening. the elections accident a clear message. they said meet the new boss instesame as the old boss. same president, same senate, same house. we truly made have will sunk the titanic. we may have put too much hope in human beings could have solved problems in many cases not nearly as booed good at it. you at least balance your checkbook at home and you pay your bills and you show up for work. washington hasn't balanced it's checkbook. it has to borrow money from the chinese to pay its bills. barely shows any real work or progress on our behalf. maybe they just aren't listening to us any more. it occurred to me if they won't listen to us i wonder if they will listen to a stronger voice. i wonder if they will listen to god? walls of water party, or signs and watonders. sometimes you speak them in a still small voice. since the leaders from either party don't seem to listen to us wonder what would happen if we asked god to speak to them so maybe they would listen to him. it may be a good day for somebody to have more of a million voice march on ca
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)